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The European Data Protection Board (EDPB), the body tasked with ensuring consistent application of the GDPR across Europe, has published its annual report for 2019. As we approach the two year anniversary of the GDPR, the EDPB Chair refers to a “common data protection culture” emerging as a result of the continued cooperation between European Data Protection Authorities (DPAs).

The following are some of the key points from the EDPB’s activities in 2019.


Continue Reading EDPB publishes Annual Report for 2019

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In Doolin v DPC [2020], the High Court held that an employer’s use of CCTV footage in an employee’s disciplinary proceedings constituted unlawful further processing. It concluded that the Data Protection Commission (DPC) had made an “error of law” in their finding that no further processing of the CCTV footage had occurred. The Court found that the CCTV footage was lawfully collected for security purposes. However, the CCTV footage was then unlawfully further processed for the purpose of the disciplinary proceedings, which was incompatible with the original purpose for which the CCTV footage was processed. The decision shows the importance of only using personal data, particularly CCTV footage, for the purpose for which it was collected.

Continue Reading Use of CCTV footage in disciplinary proceedings breached employee’s data protection rights

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The Minister for Social Protection, Regina Doherty, and the Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe, have informed the government that provision and use of the Public Services Card (PSC), not just by the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection (DEASP), but by other public bodies shall continue. The DEASP has written to the Data Protection Commission (DPC) advising it of this decision. In doing so, the Government accepts that it may be necessary for the matter to be referred to the courts for a definitive decision. The DEASP intend to publish the DPC’s investigation report following further engagement with the DPC.

Continue Reading Government challenges findings of Data Protection Commission about Public Services Cards

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A recent survey of regional data protection authorities in Germany has revealed 75 cases of reported personal data breaches since the GDPR came into effect on 25 May 2018. As a result, German authorities have imposed punitive fines totalling €449,000.

Germany differs from Ireland as the responsibility for monitoring and ensuring compliance with the GDPR and national data protection laws is delegated to each of the 16 German states, with each state possessing its own authority. A committee consisting of representatives from each regional authority (the ‘Data Protection Conference’) has also been appointed to ensure that a consistent approach is taken throughout the states.

So far, fines have been imposed in six of the sixteen federal states. The highest fines have been reported in the Baden-Wurttemberg region (€203, 000 across seven cases), Rhineland-Palatinate region (€124,000 across nine cases) and Berlin (€105,600 across eighteen cases). Examples of commonly reported GDPR violations include inadequate technical or organisational security measures (e.g. storing user password in non-encrypted form), non-compliance with information duties (e.g. lack of transparency around processing activities) and unauthorized marketing e-mails.


Continue Reading German data protection authorities issue fines in 75 cases for GDPR breaches

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The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will automatically come into force across the EU on 25 May 2018. As the deadline fast approaches, Member States are busy progressing their draft implementing legislation. Article 23 of the GDPR provides Member States with discretion over how certain provisions will apply. These proposed derogations to the GDPR have been a focus point for many commentators on the draft national legislation.

Continue Reading UK Government sets out proposed derogations under GDPR

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The Office of the Data Protection Commissioner (the ODPC) has released a guidance note on connected toys (the Guidance Note). The Guidance Note highlights the possible data protection issues that might occur when children and parents use toys with microphones and cameras that have an ability to connect to the internet.

The ODPC warns of certain potential issues with the personification of connected toys, in particular dolls. Some of these toys provide an interactive experience by reacting to selected words. This may give the impression of an emotional response to what the child says or does. In some instances, these toys are enabled to collect and record these “conversations” between the child and the connected toy on apps, smartphones or tablets. The ODPC cautions that some of these connected toys’ terms and conditions allow these potentially sensitive recordings to be shared with other companies and used for the basis of targeted advertising.


Continue Reading Child’s Play: The Office of the Data Protection Commissioner releases Guidance Note on Connected Toys

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The US Second Circuit Court of Appeals, overturning an earlier court ruling from a lower court, has held that the US Government cannot compel Microsoft to hand over emails stored on a server in Dublin in a narcotics case. The decision is a milestone victory for privacy rights and will be greatly welcomed by US technology companies storing data abroad. It should also provide reassurance to European citizens that their data will be protected by European data protection laws and the US legal system will respect their privacy rights.


Continue Reading Microsoft wins landmark US appeal against search warrant for emails stored in Ireland