Cyber Risk & Data Privacy

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As part of their lockdown exit strategy, governments around the world are launching Apps with contact tracing functions. The idea behind these Apps is that users will be alerted when another App user has tested positive to Covid-19, thereby enabling them to take appropriate action, such as self-isolating or undergoing testing.

It remains to be

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The European Data Protection Board (EDPB), the body tasked with ensuring consistent application of the GDPR across Europe, has published its annual report for 2019. As we approach the two year anniversary of the GDPR, the EDPB Chair refers to a “common data protection culture” emerging as a result of the continued cooperation between European Data Protection Authorities (DPAs).

The following are some of the key points from the EDPB’s activities in 2019.


Continue Reading EDPB publishes Annual Report for 2019

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The threat to global health caused by Covid-19 has led to unprecedented collaboration from the global scientific research community to urgently develop a vaccine. Given the prevalence of data sharing and open science, combined with the sensitive nature of the data involved, data protection concerns have quickly emerged.

The GDPR provides special rules for processing health data for scientific research purposes that are also applicable in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic. The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) recently published Guidelines 03/2020 on the processing of data concerning health for scientific research purposes in the context of Covid-19. The EDPB acknowledges the challenges faced by researchers operating with urgency, and using health data that is not always obtained directly from the data subject for the specific purpose of scientific research. The guidelines provide clarity on issues such as: the legal basis for processing health data; data subjects’ rights, and how health data can be lawfully transferred to a third country outside the EEA for scientific research purposes connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.


Continue Reading EDPB publishes guidelines on processing health data for Covid-19 research

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The Data Protection Commission (DPC) has issued its first fine under the GDPR.  Tusla, the child and family state agency, has been fined €75,000 for three data breaches.  It has been reported that the DPC has filed papers in the Circuit Court, in order for the court to confirm the fine. The purpose of this confirmation mechanism, which is required by the Data Protection Act (DPA) 2018, is to ensure that the DPC’s decision to impose a fine has due regard to fair procedures and constitutional justice.

Continue Reading Irish Data Protection Commission issues first GDPR fine

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The Annual Report of the Data Protection Commission (DPC) for 2019 reveals some interesting trends and statistics. The DPC received a record 7,215 complaints in 2019 (75% more than in 2018).  At least 40% of the DPC’s resources were devoted to the handling of individual complaints (as opposed to large-scale and more systemic

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The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has published updated Guidelines 05/2020 on Consent under the GDPR, replacing the previous Article 29 Working Party Consent Guidelines published in April 2018. The purpose of the updated guidelines is to provide clarity on: (i) data subject consent in relation to cookie walls (which are not allowed), and (ii) scrolling or swiping through a webpage or similar actions (which does not constitute valid consent). ​The paragraphs (38-41 and 86) concerning these two issues have been revised and updated, while the rest of the document has been left unchanged, except for editorial changes.

Continue Reading EDPB issue updated Guidelines on Consent

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On 6 April 2020, the Data Protection Commission (DPC) published a report on the use of cookies and other tracking technologies (Report) and an updated guidance note on cookies and other tracking technologies (Guidance).

The Report is based on a review carried out by the DPC of websites in various sectors in Ireland, including insurance, banking, media, retail and the public sector. The purpose of the DPC’s report was to examine whether organisations are complying with the law, and, in particular, how organisations are obtaining the consent of users for the use of cookies. The majority of the 38 organisations examined were found to have potential compliance issues, particularly in relation to reliance on implied consent for setting non-necessary cookies; lack of choice for users to reject all cookies; bundling of consent for all purposes; and the possible misclassification of cookies as “necessary” or “strictly necessary“.  The Report gives an overview of the responses received highlighting what the DPC considers to be both “good” and “bad” practices that it encountered on the websites, and the Guidance provides website operators with guidance on how to comply with the rules relating to cookies, which are set out in the Irish ePrivacy Regulations.


Continue Reading DPC publishes Report and Guidance on cookies following a “cross-sector and cross-size” sweep of website operators

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In Doolin v DPC [2020], the High Court held that an employer’s use of CCTV footage in an employee’s disciplinary proceedings constituted unlawful further processing. It concluded that the Data Protection Commission (DPC) had made an “error of law” in their finding that no further processing of the CCTV footage had occurred. The Court found that the CCTV footage was lawfully collected for security purposes. However, the CCTV footage was then unlawfully further processed for the purpose of the disciplinary proceedings, which was incompatible with the original purpose for which the CCTV footage was processed. The decision shows the importance of only using personal data, particularly CCTV footage, for the purpose for which it was collected.

Continue Reading Use of CCTV footage in disciplinary proceedings breached employee’s data protection rights

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In a landmark case, the UK Supreme Court has ruled that supermarket chain Morrisons is not vicariously liable for a deliberate data breach committed by a former rogue employee. The decision shows that an employer is unlikely to be liable for a malicious data breach committed by an employee, where his/her wrongful conduct is not closely connected with his/her tasks at work.

Continue Reading UK Supreme Court finds employer not vicariously liable for data breach

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Covid-19 is presenting unique and unprecedented challenges for employers who have to grapple with often complex HR and data protection related issues in a rapidly escalating crisis. Employers are anxious to ensure continuity of their business, the health and safety of their employees and compliance with data protection obligations where these arise.

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